Essay: “When Nothing Arrives”

Rebekah has a great new piece at her blog, “The Doxological Life,” entitled, “When Nothing Arrives.” An excerpt:

“My generation knows it needs to find a different kind of knowing, not one that is necessarily antithetical to Christian dogma, but one that sees faith, doubt, and dogma working together. But we are often at a loss as to how to rebuild our faith without resorting to cookie-cutter answers and insincere platitudes in responses to real suffering and tough theological problems. We’re so scared of resorting to the unfettered dogmatism of our forebears that we go in the opposite direction. Uncertainty and doubt become their own kinds of dogmatism, their own creeds.”

#11: Boiling the Paschal Sacrifice, or, Inner-Biblical Harmonistic Exegesis

Bekah and Benj discuss the apparent tension between the methods of cooking the Passover sacrifice (and the type of sacrifice) prescribed in Exodus 12 and Deuteronomy 16. We address the phenomenon of inner-biblical exegesis, particularly the Chronicler’s harmonistic exegesis of these two passages in 2 Chronicles 35. Along the way, we discuss why “someone is wrong on the internet” and how to solve this problem.

The texts in question:

  • “They shall eat the flesh that same night, roasted with fire (צלי־אשׁ), and they shall eat it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. Do not eat any of it raw or boiled at all with water (בשׁל מבשׁל במים), but rather roasted with fire (כי אם־צלי אשׁ), both its head and its legs along with its entrails” (Exod 12:8-9).
  • “You shall boil (ובשׁלת) and eat it in the place which the LORD your God chooses” (Deut 16:7a).
  • The Chronicler has harmonized the two traditions by specifying that it was “boiled with fire” (ויבשׁלו הפסח באשׁ כמשׁפט).

Further Reading:

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#10: Nursing Metaphor in Isaiah

In this episode, Rebekah discusses some of her research on the use of the nursing metaphor in Isaiah. This motif, sometimes under-appreciated, turns out to be quite versatile in the book of Isaiah.

You can read Rebekah’s paper–which contains references for further reading–here.

Don’t forget to subscribe on iTunes, and email us if you like the show or have questions: benjamingiffone [at] gmail. Please be sure to “like” and share our Facebook page!

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#9: Exile and Hope in the Deuteronomistic History and in Chronicles

After a six-month hiatus for a transatlantic move (Benjamin) and the birth of a child (Rebekah), Out of Exile is back with a new podcast. In this episode, we consider the different perspectives on the Babylonian exile found in the so-called Deuteronomistic History (Deut-Josh-Jdg-Sam-Kgs) and in Chronicles.

If you’d like to read more of Benj’s work on Chronicles, you can check out this page on his website.

Don’t forget to subscribe on iTunes, and email us if you like the show or have questions: benjamingiffone [at] gmail. Please be sure to “like” and share our Facebook page!

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Discussion #8: 1 Corinthians 8-11 through the Lens of Sacrifice Eating

In this podcast, Rebekah and Benj consider whether the apparent incoherence and inconsistency in 1 Corinthians 8-11 can be resolved when the passage is viewed through the lens of the practice of eating sacrifices in the ancient world.

In the process, we may have established a new line of ideological biblical criticism: “thusiaphagological criticism,” which is viewing everything through the lens of sacrifice eating.

As discussed in the show, this exchange between Troy Martin and Mark Goodacre in JBL may add some clarity to the puzzling commands in 1 Corinthians 11 (see PDFs at the end of this post).

Troy W. Martin, “Paul’s Argument from Nature for the Veil in 1 Corinthians 11:13–15: A Testicle instead of a Head Covering,” JBL 123 (2004): 75-84.
Mark Goodacre, “Does περιβόλαιον Mean ‘Testicle’ in 1 Corinthians 11:15?” JBL 130 (2011): 391-96. Troy W. Martin, “Περιβόλαιον as “Testicle” in 1 Corinthians 11:15: A Response to Mark Goodacre,” JBL 132 (2013): 453-465.

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j2011 Goodacre Does περιβόλαιον Mean Testicle”in 1 Corinthians 11_15.pdf

j2013 Martin Περιβόλαιον as Testicle – A Response to Mark Goodacre.pdf

j2004 Martin Paul’s Argument from Nature.pdf

Discussion #7: The Book of Numbers in 1 Corinthians, Eating, the Eucharist, and Sexuality

Here’s the second half of our May 4 discussion, which focuses on the use of the book of Numbers in 1 Corinthians 10, and the relationship of sacrificial eating to the Eucharist and sexuality. The first half (here) addresses Numbers 5, Deuteronomy 22, and the tests for marital infidelity in the Pentateuch.

Don’t forget to subscribe on iTunes, and email us if you like the show or have questions: benjamingiffone [at] gmail.